Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

Station Number: OH-HM-24

Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

Station Number: OH-HM-24

Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

Station Number: OH-HM-24
Station Name: Cheviot 3.4 W

Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

Sycamore Anthracnose Symptoms Fade

 

  This morning I got a message from Frank Leon, horticulturist with Barnes Nursery, complete with the above image showing the thinning of sycamore (American planetree; Platanus occidentalis), a common sight seen in northwest Ohio this Spring. The problem is sycamore anthracnose, caused by the fungus Apiognomonia veneta.

 

 

This particular anthracnose fungus occurs on planetrees, including our native sycamore, but less so on Platanus orientalis and the hybrid between these two planetrees, Londone planetree (PlatanusX acerifolia…

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Observations: Socrates, Poison Hemlock, Fennel Aphids, and Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles

 

Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum, family Apiaceae) is one of the deadliest plants in North America. This non-native invasive weed contains highly toxic piperidine alkaloid compounds, including coniine and gamma-coniceine, which cause respiratory failure and death when ingested by mammals. So, how can fennel aphids survive sucking juices from the plant that killed Socrates and how can lady beetles survive eating the aphids?
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

Station Number: OH-HM-24
Station Name: Cheviot 3.4 W
Report Date: 6/10/2017
Submitted: 6/10/2017 7:06 AM
Scale Bar: Near Normal
Description:

Getting much drier around here after a record wet spring. 7 day rainfall and June rainfall only 0.52 inch. This fell in a thunderstorm late Tuesday. With hot, dry weather in the forecast the next few days, I expect even drier conditions. Parts of the area got less rain in the spring and missed the Tuesday thunderstorm. Those areas are turning a little brown. Lawns here are still green and landscapes are healthy. Late planted crops are struggling to get started in the now dry conditions.

Categories:
General Awareness
Agriculture
Plants And Wildlife

Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

 Station Number: OH-HM-24
Station Name: Cheviot 3.4 W
Report Date: 6/3/2017
Submitted: 6/03/2017 6:48 AM
Scale Bar: Mildly Wet
Description:
Rainfall over the past 7 days was actually below normal at 0.49 inch with very good drying rates. Soil moisture is still above normal after being severely wet just a week ago. Local plants, crops, or pastures are healthy, recovering from and draining from wet conditions. Areas of standing water have mostly dried up and most runoff from hillsides has stopped. Water logged areas of my yard were actually able to be mowed yesterday. Creeks and rivers are returning to normal levels. We finished May 12.26 inches ahead of the normal year to date rainfall. Annual rainfall of 31.27 inches compared to normal rainfall of 43 inches in an entire year!
Categories: General Awareness
Agriculture
Plants And Wildlife

Plant Health Care. It’s Not That Simple. Really.

Plant health care care may seem simple, but it’s not.

Many people assume there is something I can treat with, even the same day, and the problem is solved. That is most often not the case. In a recent case, we got a call about declining blue spruce trees with the request that we come out and treat the same day. Blue spruce decline is widespread and complicated. There is nothing I can do the same day. There may be nothing I can do at all depending on how declined the trees are. However, often we can put together a treatment plan which should help.

There is an entire diagnostic protocol I must follow before even arriving at any treatment which includes but is not limited to:

  1. What is the plant?
  2. What does a healthy plant look like?
  3. What are common problems for the plant? (Example: What diseases is the plant known to get? Does it always need a lot of sun or shade?)
  4. What do you see that looks abnormal? (Example: Is the plant wilting? Is the soil dry?)
  5. What is the overall health of the plant? (Example: Is it only part of the plant that is sick or the entire plant?)
  6. What exactly do you see? (Example: What are the signs and symptoms?)
  7. What do you see on the other plants surrounding it? (Example: Are other plants sick too?)
  8. What is the site? (Example: What does the environment around the plant look like?)
  9. Who knows about the plants? (Example: Who has access to the plants? Does someone specific watch over the care of the plants?)
  10. When did the symptoms first appear? (Example: How long have the symptoms been there?)
  11. What is the horticultural history? (Example: When was it first planted there?)
  12. What is the environmental history? (Example: Is the site known to be really wet or really dry?
  13. What does the client think the problem is? (Example: Did the client apply too much fertilizer or water the plant too much?)
  14. What diagnostic tools are useful?
  15. What additional resources are available?
  16. How do you take samples?
  17. What other information do you need to help you find the problem?
  18. What is your diagnosis?
  19. What is the significance of the problem?
  20. What are your recommendations? (Management strategies or control measures.)

Just, basically, if someone says they want me to come out and treat the same day, that probably won’t happen. What will happen is I can meet with them, evaluate the condition of the plant(s), and the potential causes of identified problems, then formulate a plan to address the issues we are seeing.

Note: The 20 questions of plant diagnostics was originally authored by Joe Boggs and Jim Chatfield of The Ohio State University Extension.

Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report