Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

Station Number: OH-HM-24
Station Name: Cheviot 3.4 W
Report Date: 6/10/2017
Submitted: 6/10/2017 7:06 AM
Scale Bar: Near Normal
Description:

Getting much drier around here after a record wet spring. 7 day rainfall and June rainfall only 0.52 inch. This fell in a thunderstorm late Tuesday. With hot, dry weather in the forecast the next few days, I expect even drier conditions. Parts of the area got less rain in the spring and missed the Tuesday thunderstorm. Those areas are turning a little brown. Lawns here are still green and landscapes are healthy. Late planted crops are struggling to get started in the now dry conditions.

Categories:
General Awareness
Agriculture
Plants And Wildlife

Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

 Station Number: OH-HM-24
Station Name: Cheviot 3.4 W
Report Date: 6/3/2017
Submitted: 6/03/2017 6:48 AM
Scale Bar: Mildly Wet
Description:
Rainfall over the past 7 days was actually below normal at 0.49 inch with very good drying rates. Soil moisture is still above normal after being severely wet just a week ago. Local plants, crops, or pastures are healthy, recovering from and draining from wet conditions. Areas of standing water have mostly dried up and most runoff from hillsides has stopped. Water logged areas of my yard were actually able to be mowed yesterday. Creeks and rivers are returning to normal levels. We finished May 12.26 inches ahead of the normal year to date rainfall. Annual rainfall of 31.27 inches compared to normal rainfall of 43 inches in an entire year!
Categories: General Awareness
Agriculture
Plants And Wildlife

Plant Health Care. It’s Not That Simple. Really.

Plant health care care may seem simple, but it’s not.

Many people assume there is something I can treat with, even the same day, and the problem is solved. That is most often not the case. In a recent case, we got a call about declining blue spruce trees with the request that we come out and treat the same day. Blue spruce decline is widespread and complicated. There is nothing I can do the same day. There may be nothing I can do at all depending on how declined the trees are. However, often we can put together a treatment plan which should help.

There is an entire diagnostic protocol I must follow before even arriving at any treatment which includes but is not limited to:

  1. What is the plant?
  2. What does a healthy plant look like?
  3. What are common problems for the plant? (Example: What diseases is the plant known to get? Does it always need a lot of sun or shade?)
  4. What do you see that looks abnormal? (Example: Is the plant wilting? Is the soil dry?)
  5. What is the overall health of the plant? (Example: Is it only part of the plant that is sick or the entire plant?)
  6. What exactly do you see? (Example: What are the signs and symptoms?)
  7. What do you see on the other plants surrounding it? (Example: Are other plants sick too?)
  8. What is the site? (Example: What does the environment around the plant look like?)
  9. Who knows about the plants? (Example: Who has access to the plants? Does someone specific watch over the care of the plants?)
  10. When did the symptoms first appear? (Example: How long have the symptoms been there?)
  11. What is the horticultural history? (Example: When was it first planted there?)
  12. What is the environmental history? (Example: Is the site known to be really wet or really dry?
  13. What does the client think the problem is? (Example: Did the client apply too much fertilizer or water the plant too much?)
  14. What diagnostic tools are useful?
  15. What additional resources are available?
  16. How do you take samples?
  17. What other information do you need to help you find the problem?
  18. What is your diagnosis?
  19. What is the significance of the problem?
  20. What are your recommendations? (Management strategies or control measures.)

Just, basically, if someone says they want me to come out and treat the same day, that probably won’t happen. What will happen is I can meet with them, evaluate the condition of the plant(s), and the potential causes of identified problems, then formulate a plan to address the issues we are seeing.

Note: The 20 questions of plant diagnostics was originally authored by Joe Boggs and Jim Chatfield of The Ohio State University Extension.

Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

Arbor Doctor Is Hiring!

 

Job Name/Title: Plant Health Care Specialist
Job Location: 6720 Kepler Road, Unit H7, Cleves, Ohio 45002 with clients throughout Cincinnati metro area
Job Description: Arbor Doctor LLC is currently searching for experienced Plant Health Care Specialists. We offer year-round employment and provide training and frequent educational opportunities. QUALIFICATIONS The ideal candidates will have 1+ years’ experience working in Landscaping or Plant Health Care, ability to identify the basic trees and shrubs common to the service area, Pesticide Applicator’s License, valid driver’s license with clean driving record, ISA membership and certification a plus but not required. BENEFITS AFLAC, 401K Match. EOE Employer/Veterans welcome and encouraged to apply. Sustainable plant health care field services including doing regular applications of organic foliar nutrients and plant pest suppression as needed using low or no toxicity products, client consultations, sales, scheduling. Frequent continuing education opportunities. Established company. Mostly high-end clientele. Arbor Doctor does not do large tree pruning or removal, specializing in tree preservation, tree growth regulators, air knife, landscape installation, smaller tree pruning. Arbor Doctor owner is an ISA Board Certified Master Arborist with 35 years industry experience. Seeking individual who is self-motivated and wants to work long term in a growing company.
Salary: (optional) Please send salary history and requirements.
Employer Address: Mail: PO Box 11094
Employer City: Cincinnati
Employer State/Province : Ohio
Employer Zip/Postal Code: 45211
Employer Phone Number: 513.661-2673
Employer E-mail Address: Click here to send an e-mail.
Categories:
Commercial/Residential

Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

Condition Monitoring Report
Station Number: OH-HM-24
Station Name: Cheviot 3.4 W
Report Date: 5/20/2017
Submitted: 5/20/2017 6:53 AM
Scale Bar: Mildly Wet
Description:

7 day rainfall 0.29. 13 week rainfall 21.40. Below normal rainfall over the past 7 days combined with hot temperatures and frequent breezes allowed for good drying this week and finally allowed seemingly perpetually flooded and boggy areas to dry out some. Runoff has eased, rivers have receded a bit, and some fields have become workable.

Categories: General Awareness
Agriculture

What Good is Dead Wood?

When you hear a barred owl calling “whooo, who cooks for you?” in the woods, chances are it’s calling from a nest cavity in the limb of a dying tree. When you see the bright red head of a woodpecker as it streaks through the forest, chances are it’s flying from the home it excavated in a hollow snag. When you encounter a fox, field mouse, opossum, raccoon or other woodland mammal, chances are that dead logs, stumps and brush on the forest floor provide the cover these creatures need to survive. And when you turn over a fallen log to find a salamander, you uncover the hidden world that thrives beneath the moist, decaying wood. Read more here>>>

Recent Cold Temperatures Leaves a Variable Path of Damage to Plants in Ohio

 

Depending on your geographical location in Ohio, the location of the plant, the actual low temperature, the plant species, as well as the growth stage on the species, the results of frost and freeze damage was variable across the state this past week.  Frost and freeze damage is so interesting because of so many variables.  A plant in a certain stage of growth may be more susceptible to frost or freeze damage than at other times.  The location of the plant in the garden may dictate the extent of the damage.  For instance, there might be two of the exact same plants in the same garden with…

Published on
Authors
Pam Bennett

UPDATE: Early-Emerging Periodical Cicadas

 

In my May 1, 2017, BYGL Alert! posting (Please Report Early-Bird Periodical Cicadas), I noted that Gene Kritsky (Mount St. Joseph University, Cincinnati) was predicting that we will see an “early emergence” of some members of Brood X of the 17-year periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) this spring even though this brood is not expected to emerge full force until 2021. In fact, as you can see by the photos I took in Springdale (Hamilton County), OH, the emergence is now well underway.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

 

Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

Condition Monitoring Report
Station Number: OH-HM-24
Station Name: Cheviot 3.4 W
Report Date: 4/21/2017
Submitted: 4/21/2017 9:23 PM
Scale Bar: Severely Wet
Description:
Soil is wet. Ground is completely saturated with water. Areas of standing water and hillside runoff. Lawns and vegetation are lush and growing rapidly. Heavy storms with significant flash flooding 6 days ago. 2.47 inches of rain in the past 7 days and 13.5 inches of rain in the past 7 weeks. Rainfall has been somewhat localized so effects on local rivers have been moderate.
Categories: General Awareness
Agriculture

Soil Moisture Condition Monitoring Report

Station Number: OH-HM-24
Station Name: Cheviot 3.4 W
Report Date: 4/14/2017
Submitted: 4/14/2017 9:34 PM
Scale Bar: Moderately Wet
Description:
Soil is very damp. The ground is still partially saturated with water but with significant drying over the past week.
Not much standing water remaining. Local plants and pastures are healthy and lush. Water bodies remain slightly more full than normal.
Categories: General Awareness

Ash Treatment Recommendations Remain Unchanged

As Emerald Ash Borer continues to spread, we have been saying that over time we may be able to back off some on treatment. The jury is still out on that and conversations with experts such as Dr. Dan Hermes and Joe Boggs of The Ohio State University confirm that not only do we need to keep up the two-year treatment interval with Treeage, but it is unclear when, or even if, we will be able to step down treatment.

At Arbor Doctor, we still believe we will be able to step down at some point. However, we also are committed to following the best recommendation and that is to maintain the 2-year treatment interval.

Just a reminder that we treat after leaves emerge fully. Most treatments should be completed by the end of June.