From Buckeye Yard and Garden Line

ODA Announces 2018 Gypsy Moth Treatment Project Open Houses

While all is quite in the gypsy moth’s world, much preparation is occurring in Ohio to manage future gypsy moth populations this year as part of the two programs ODA administers:  Slow-The-Spread and Suppression.  Recently ODA released the schedule for their 2018 Gypsy Moth Treatment Open Houses and the 2018 Treatment Maps. Treatment blocks have been identified and are planned in19 Ohio Counties. Treatments will occur after caterpillars hatch this spring and when weather conditions are favorable.  Treatments are made to protect trees from damage from the leaf feeding caterpillars like seen…

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

USDA Updates Emerald Ash Borer Map, January 2018

While emerald ash borer (EAB) may be considered “old-news” in the buckeye state, many may want to keep a watchful eye on its progression beyond Ohio. Each month, USDA APHIS produces an updated EAB Detection Map. Occasionally, we like to post these updated maps on BYGL for those that are interested in monitoring the spread of the pest in North America.

 

The most recent additions to the map include:

  • initial county detections in: St. Clair and Talladega Counties, Alabama; Queens County, New York; and Eau…
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

ODA Announces New Finds of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in Ohio in Athens, Geauga and Lake Counties

Earlier today, the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) the Ohio Department of Natural Resources(ODNR) announced the discovery of a hemlock-killing pest in Lake, Geauga and Athens counties. The hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) is a small, aphid-like insect native to Asia, which threatens the health and sustainability of two hemlock tree species native to the eastern United States.

 

HWA was first reported in the eastern United States in 1951 near Richmond, Virginia. Today, it is established in portions of 20 states from…

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Scouting for Scale at Snowy Solstice

 

Scouting for scale in the Winter is great use of your time.

Scale comes in many shapes, sizes and varieties. Last year we saw Oyster Shell, Calico, Juniper, Greevy, Bamboo, Fletcher, Zimmerman, Japanese maple, Pine Needle, Brown, Putnam, Euonymus and Magnolia Scale.

Scale is sometimes hard to see when a plant is in full foliage. But in the winter with no leaves on trees and shrubs, except evergreen, scale are easier to see.

Scouting scale in the winter makes sense because there is less to care for outside in the landscape. The following pictures are Scale images on…

Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas

Halloweeen Horrors

In a recent bygl-alert (https://bygl.osu.edu/node/944) I posed this challenge: More wicked (sometimes) plants this way shall come, culminating with Halloween, bygl alert-style. What are your candidates for the ultimate in plant wickedness? E-mail me at chatfield.1@osu.edu.

 

Or at least spookiness of some sort. Here are a few of your responses:

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Horticultural Horrors I

  Friday the 13th has just passed and in some sort of dyslexic dystopia, the 31st is just around the corner and Halloween will soon arrive. So it seems only right to write of that which is wrong – or shall we say – wicked, as in Wicked Plants. There is an excellent book by just that title, Wicked Plants: The Weed That Killed Lincoln’s Mother and Other Botanical Atrocitiesby Amy Stewart. I recommend it, but for now, let us take a little trip into the world of some plants wicked this way come, through the house of horticultural horrors, guided by myself…

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Disease, Demystified

What are control strategies for managing oak wilt disease? What do we know about beech leaf disease? Does rose rosette virus affect ‘Knockout’ roses? Which crabapples have good genetic resistance to apple scab disease and how does this compare to 20 years ago? Does apple scab on the fruit matter (as seen on the lead slide for this bygl-alert)?

 

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Erik Draper

They’re Heeeere!

Boxelder Bugs were included along with several other notorious nuisance insects in my BYGL Alert titled, Fall Home Invaders are Poised to Enter (Sept. 30, 2017). They may have been poised then, but the bugs are now visiting homes en masse in southern Ohio. Indeed, I visited a home on Wednesday that was literally buggy with the bugs.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Magnolia Scale Update

I first reported on Magnolia Scale (Neolecanium cornuparvum) this season in June when the maturing females were “puffing-up” and pumping out honeydew (see BYGL Alert, “Magnolia Scale is Pumping-Out Honeydew,” June 16, 2017). My lengthy BYGL post included a description of the life-cycle for this “soft scale” as well as information on management options.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Delayed Woolly Bear Crawl-About?

Bristly “woolly bear” caterpillars commence their annual crawl-abouts in search of sheltered winter quarters in the fall; it’s usually sometime in September in Ohio. They may be found on sidewalks, walking trails, roadways, or on the walls of homes and buildings. However, insects are sometimes made most noticeable by their absence.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Ode to the Buttonwood Tree

I often ask students in Master Gardener classes “what is a buttonwood tree?” to illustrate the challenge with common names of plants. Unlike scientific names, there is no recognized governing body that standardizes common names of plants. Consequently, plant names may vary widely (wildly?) owing to differences in the cultural backgrounds of people living in different geographical regions, among other things.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Guignardia Leaf Blotch Running Rampant

boggs.47 Tue, 07/25/2017 – 10:38

Our continual wet weather over much of Ohio this season has been a two-edged sword. On one hand, we haven’t had to drag hoses to water our landscapes. On the other hand, a number of fungal plant pathogens that require wet conditions to infect and produce their associated diseases are running rampant. Such is obviously the case for Guignardia aesculi; the fungus responsible for Guignardia Leaf Blotch of Aesculus.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Fall Webworm Update and More Red-Heads Found

Fall Webworm has two generations per season in Ohio. The “fall” in the webworm’s common name is based on the appearance of second generation nests late in the season. First generation nests began to appear in southern Ohio in late May and second generation caterpillars are now on the scene. Localized fall webworm populations are high throughout the state with nests becoming more evident as they undergo late-season expansion.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs